It’s been a month, and you still feel like that stupid, naïve freshmen you felt like when you moved in. It’s been a month, and you still have no idea what’s going on in your classes. It’s been a month, and you don’t yet have a solid group of friends. Well guess what? You’re not alone.

Jeremy Wronski

This past Thursday marked a full month since the start of school, and for freshmen, the first month of learning and socializing in a college setting. For some freshmen, the transition is seamless, they are doing well in their classes and seem to be making a lot of friends. For the majority, however, this is not the case. And that’s okay.

Julia Pennanen in her dorm

Wake up and actually make it to your classes on time. Adapt to a very different, collegiate style of teaching. Get involved with on-campus activities. Maintain a social life. Be away from your parents for the first time in 18 years. This is all in the first month!

It’s even harder when you are still unsure of your major or even school. No wonder why about 28 percent of freshmen drop out before the start of their sophomore year and of that 72 percent that chose to stay in school, 60 percent of them transfer to other colleges for their sophomore year.

Saint Joseph’s University calls this time of a rather rough transition and self-doubt the “Freshmen Funk”. Freshman Julia Pennanen describes the “Freshmen Funk” as a period of time when “you just moved in and you’re just starting to adjust and everything is not really what you’ve expected. It’s not great.”

Not only are freshmen exposed to a lot of external changes, but they are also at the peak age of developing depression. This further complicates things. When asked if freshman Jeremy Wronski would ever seek help for his college transition he said, “Not only would I consider it, I actually have gone a couple of time, it’s been very helpful so I think you should too.”

 

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