It’s a Saturday night and you expect to go out with your best friends, but they all have a sorority event to go to. So, you’re stuck binge watching the latest netflix show by yourself and going to bed before midnight. Or, you hangout with your other friends, but have to hear about the event from your sorority friends the next day.

So, what’s it like being that one friend not in a sorority? We asked Rose McNamara and Corianna Depice this question and found out it has its ups and downs. As a freshmen, you can rush in spring semester, and sophomores and juniors can rush in the fall. For people not interested in rushing, it probably feels like they are the only ones, but that’s not the case.

Credit: Connor Kane

Just about 22% of SJU undergraduate students are involved in Greek Life on campus. That’s about 1,070 students making up almost a quarter of the school’s population of 4,860 students. It may seem like that’s a small portion, but when all your closest friends are apart of that 22%, it can be a lot. For Rose and Corianne, they aren’t in that 22%, but all their best friends are.

While sometimes they feel left out, like when there is a mandatory sorority event, for the most part they don’t feel excluded. They both have made other friends, as most of us do, and their friends in sororities connect them with people too. They always get invited to sorority events, whether it’s a philanthropy event or a formal. Both girls chose not to join a sorority and they have accepted what comes with that decision.

So, is it really that bad not being in a sorority when all your friends are? Yes, sometimes it’s lonely when your friends have events that you can’t go to, but there is a handful of events that you can attend. If you’re not in the 22% of students involved in Greek Life, but you’re friends are, there are ways to get around it and make new friends.

 

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